Communication Saturation

Mayfield Heights, No on Issue 48  // Ohio // November 2018 General


Overview

The Mayor and City Council of Mayfield Heights, a small suburban community, proposed an income tax increase. The local business community used topplr to fight back against the increase by developing a strategic digital outreach campaign. Their efforts using our platform enabled the opposition to defeat the referendum 2-to-1, swinging the issue 59 points from polling conducted less than two months before the election.

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Strategy Takeaway

The popularity of the Mayor and Council leadership coupled with two early polls suggested the increase would pass easily. The first poll reported 49% of residents to be for Issue 48 and 38% to be against it, with 12% undecided. The second poll was even more dismal looking for the opposition campaign with 58% of residents reporting support for the measure, 34% reporting disapproval, and 8% saying they were undecided.

Our efforts over the course of a six-week marketing blitz focused on two targets. First, we focused our budget on displaying a series of six video ads on Facebook, Instagram, and Associated Apps to identity-resolved registered voters in the city. The videos sought to educate voters on the possible negative aspects of a Yes vote. After ensuring our most important audience had seen the message multiple times we broadened communication to everyone in city limits to create a buzz around what was happening.

Result

The ads got people talking. With multiple issues being raised we moved more than the 8-12% of undecided voters that prior polling had identified, we actually changed minds when it came to Issue 48. By the end of Election Day, we persuaded 17-26% of voters who were definitely supporters of the issue two months prior to shift their opinions and vote in opposition to the issue.

The No on Issue 48 campaign demonstrated the power of targeted social media to identify voters and deliver messages precisely to those who are most likely respond in ways that can change a campaign.



Nick Martin